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Your Child and ADHD

Helping your child navigate ADHD can be difficult, but with some helpful information, you can be better prepared to help them.

Talking to your child about ADHD  

ADHD treatment assessment  

ADHD in boys and girls  

Talking to your child about ADHD


Your child may feel sad or angry about having ADHD. It is important to talk to them about their condition. Let them know that it is not their fault that they have ADHD.

Their condition does not define them. In the same way that another child might need eyeglasses to see, your child may need ADHD treatment to be their best self.

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Discussing treatment and ongoing symptoms

It’s also important to discuss ADHD symptoms and treatments with your child. Be sure to ask them if their current treatment is helping or if they are experiencing side effects. Additionally, check in with your child to see what symptoms continue to affect them, even with their current treatment.

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Drug holidays

Some parents may consider giving their child a “drug holiday” - or a planned break from ADHD treatment. Because this can worsen ADHD symptoms and have other negative effects, you should have a conversation with your child and their doctor before considering a break.

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Your child’s feelings and reactions should be considered when making further decisions about ADHD treatment. Including them in the discussion can make them more comfortable with their treatment.

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Is it time to reconsider your child's ADHD treatment?

Treatment assessment


Consider the questions below to help you assess the effectiveness of your child’s current ADHD treatment.

Number_1

Have your child’s ADHD symptoms been effectively managed in the last 6 months?


Number_2

Has your child experienced negative side effects from their current ADHD medications?


Number_3

Is it difficult to maintain a consistent treatment schedule with your child’s current ADHD medication?


Number_4

Has your child ever abused, misused, or become dependent on their ADHD medication?

If your child continues to struggle with ADHD, talk to your doctor to see if Qelbree is right for your child.

See Qelbree's proven results 

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The attention to
make studying

unstoppable

ADHD can affect boys and girls differently


ADHD is common among both boys and girls, but this condition is often undiagnosed in young girls. Boys’ symptoms of ADHD often fit the stereotypical ideas about ADHD, whereas girls’ symptoms are often overlooked.

It is important to know what these differences look like in order to better assess your child’s possible ADHD symptoms.

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Boys are more likely to:

  • Act out and be restless
  • Blame external factors for their symptoms
  • Suffer from hyperactivity and impulsivity
  • Be diagnosed and receive treatment

Girls are more likely to:

  • Daydream and underachieve
  • Blame themselves for their symptoms
  • Suffer from inattention
  • Be undiagnosed
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Identifying ADHD in girls


Girls with ADHD that goes undiagnosed often develop depression, anxiety, and/or eating disorders that may follow them into adulthood. It’s important not to overlook less obvious symptoms in girls and to get them the help they need.

Talk to your doctor if you think your daughter might be exhibiting symptoms of ADHD.

A change you can see

Qelbree is the first nonstimulant approved for ADHD in over a decade.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE

INDICATION

QelbreeTM (viloxazine extended-release capsules) is a prescription medicine used to treat ADHD in children ages 6 to 17.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, especially within the first few months of treatment [read more] or when the dose is changed. Tell your child’s doctor if they have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your child’s moods, behaviors, thoughts and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed. [read more] Tell your child’s doctor if they have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your child’s moods, behaviors, thoughts and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

Your child should not take Qelbree if they:
Take a medicine for depression called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days. Also, your child should avoid alosetron, duloxetine, ramelteon, tasimelteon, tizanidine, and theophylline.

Qelbree can increase blood pressure and heart rate. Your child’s doctor will monitor these vital signs.

Qelbree may cause manic episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. Tell your child’s doctor if they show any signs of mania.

Do not let your teen drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Qelbree will affect them. Qelbree may cause your teen to feel sleepy or tired.

The most common side effects of Qelbree include sleepiness, not feeling hungry, feeling tired, nausea, vomiting, trouble sleeping, and irritability. These are not all the possible side effects of Qelbree.

You may report negative side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see Medication Guide including Boxed Warning.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE

INDICATION

QelbreeTM (viloxazine extended-release capsules) is a prescription medicine used to treat ADHD in children ages 6 to 17.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, especially within the first few months of treatment [read more] or when the dose is changed. Tell your child’s doctor if they have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your child’s moods, behaviors, thoughts and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed. [read more] Tell your child’s doctor if they have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your child’s moods, behaviors, thoughts and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

Your child should not take Qelbree if they:
Take a medicine for depression called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days. Also, your child should avoid alosetron, duloxetine, ramelteon, tasimelteon, tizanidine, and theophylline.

Qelbree can increase blood pressure and heart rate. Your child’s doctor will monitor these vital signs.

Qelbree may cause manic episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. Tell your child’s doctor if they show any signs of mania.

Do not let your teen drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Qelbree will affect them. Qelbree may cause your teen to feel sleepy or tired.

The most common side effects of Qelbree include sleepiness, not feeling hungry, feeling tired, nausea, vomiting, trouble sleeping, and irritability. These are not all the possible side effects of Qelbree.

You may report negative side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see Medication Guide including Boxed Warning.