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Adult ADHD can feel overwhelming

Everyone has their own ADHD journey. The more you understand about your diagnosis, the better you can navigate your treatment.

ADHD in adulthood  

Treatment options  

Understanding signs and symptoms of ADHD in adulthood


Did you know ADHD symptoms can be different in children and adults?

If you were diagnosed with ADHD as a child, your symptoms might have changed as you entered adulthood. You may find yourself more distracted versus the more hyperactive signs of childhood ADHD.

What are some common signs of ADHD in adults?

Some symptoms of predominantly inattentive ADHD can include:

  • Often failing to give close attention to details, like making frequent errors at work
  • Difficulty starting, paying attention to, and completing tasks
  • Trouble listening when spoken to
  • Often losing or forgetting important items like your phone or keys

Some symptoms of predominantly hyperactive and impulsive ADHD can include:

  • Trouble staying seated or fidgeting
  • Feeling restless or always “on the go”
  • Interrupting others often
  • Feeling impatient when forced to wait in line or wait for someone else to finish a task

Combined (inattentive/hyperactive-impulsive) ADHD looks like a combination of both types of ADHD. As with any diagnosis, the conversation should always start with your doctor.

Did you know women are often less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD?

That doesn’t mean there isn’t a prevalence of ADHD in females. Women tend to mask or overcompensate for their symptoms, leading to a missed diagnosis of ADHD.

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It may be time to reflect on your adult ADHD treatment approach

You have more options now than ever before. Talk to your doctor to help build a treatment plan that’s right for you.

Start your Qelbree Doctor Discussion Guide

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ADHD in adulthood  

Treatment options  

Is your treatment plan currently meeting your needs as an adult?


There are currently two types of treatment options for ADHD: stimulants and non-stimulants.

Managing your ADHD involves periodically reviewing your treatment needs. Some questions to ask yourself include:

  •  Are you on treatment?
  •  Is it meeting your goals?
  •  Do you ever feel the need to take “drug holidays” or breaks from your medication?
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Capsules

How much do you know about non-stimulants?

Non-stimulants work differently than stimulants to help reduce ADHD symptoms. They may take a little longer to be fully effective, but some patients saw results with Qelbree as early as week 2.

Non-stimulants like Qelbree are a non-controlled substance and have no potential for abuse compared to stimulants

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Ask your doctor if a non-stimulant like Qelbree could be right for you.

Get tips on how to start the conversation  

What is Qelbree?

Qelbree is the first non-stimulant approved for adult ADHD in over 20 years.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE

INDICATION

Qelbree® (viloxazine extended-release capsules) is a prescription medicine used to treat ADHD in adults and children 6 years and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, in adults and children with ADHD, especially within the first few months of treatment [read more] or when the dose is changed. Tell your doctor if you have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your moods, behaviors, thoughts, and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, in adults and children with ADHD, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed. [read more] Tell your doctor if you have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your moods, behaviors, thoughts, and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

You should not take Qelbree if you:
Take a medicine for depression called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) or have stopped taking an MAOI in the past 14 days. Also, you should avoid alosetron, duloxetine, ramelteon, tasimelteon, tizanidine, and theophylline.

Qelbree can increase blood pressure and heart rate. Your doctor will monitor these vital signs.

Qelbree may cause manic episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. Tell your doctor if you show any signs of mania.

Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Qelbree will affect you. Qelbree may cause you to feel sleepy or tired.

The most common side effects of Qelbree in patients 6 to 17 years are sleepiness, not feeling hungry, feeling tired, nausea, vomiting, trouble sleeping, and irritability, and in adults, insomnia, headache, sleepiness, tiredness, nausea, decreased appetite, dry mouth, and constipation. These are not all the possible side effects of Qelbree.

You may report negative side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see Medication Guide including Boxed Warning.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE

INDICATION

Qelbree® (viloxazine extended-release capsules) is a prescription medicine used to treat ADHD in adults and children 6 years and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, in adults and children with ADHD, especially within the first few months of treatment [read more] or when the dose is changed. Tell your doctor if you have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your moods, behaviors, thoughts, and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT QELBREE
Qelbree may increase suicidal thoughts and actions, in adults and children with ADHD, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed. [read more] Tell your doctor if you have (or if there is a family history of) suicidal thoughts or actions before starting Qelbree. Monitor your moods, behaviors, thoughts, and feelings during treatment with Qelbree. Report any new or sudden changes in these symptoms right away.

You should not take Qelbree if you:
Take a medicine for depression called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) or have stopped taking an MAOI in the past 14 days. Also, you should avoid alosetron, duloxetine, ramelteon, tasimelteon, tizanidine, and theophylline.

Qelbree can increase blood pressure and heart rate. Your doctor will monitor these vital signs.

Qelbree may cause manic episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. Tell your doctor if you show any signs of mania.

Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Qelbree will affect you. Qelbree may cause you to feel sleepy or tired.

The most common side effects of Qelbree in patients 6 to 17 years are sleepiness, not feeling hungry, feeling tired, nausea, vomiting, trouble sleeping, and irritability, and in adults, insomnia, headache, sleepiness, tiredness, nausea, decreased appetite, dry mouth, and constipation. These are not all the possible side effects of Qelbree.

You may report negative side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see Medication Guide including Boxed Warning.